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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
and civil rights leader, clarence mitchell iii, details on the death and one of the state's most prominent political families. game four of the alds. we hope the o's can pull out a win. now your maryland lottery midday numbers. >> ♪ the maryland lottery, let yourself play ♪ >> go o's. et's go to your pick three game. 5. 3. final numbers, 3. 5, 3, 3. we will get to your pick four in a moment. the latest ravens fan is katie from laurel, delaware. she won $6,000. find out how you can become a fan of the game. all set and ready to go with your four numbers. 0. 3. 0. last number, 9. 0, 3, 0, 9. the maryland lottery, let yourself play. >> thank you so much for joining us for 11 news at noon. we want to remind you to watch tonight. [captioning made possible by barnhill: you hear a lot of talk about question seven... so let me tell you what i know: if question seven passes, my company's going to... bring table games, like blackjack and poker... right here to baltimore. a twenty-five million dollar investment... that'll create five hundred new jobs. all right here. today, marylanders are spendi
come from? >> guest: well, my first political involvement was in the civil rights movement, where i came along at a time when if you were young and idealistic and in the south, that was--you pretty much were drawn to that. c-span: but what got you interested in that? what--what kind of a--what was the home like? >> guest: my family is quite conservative. my father is, i would say, extremely conservative. i--it was--it--it--it... c-span: is he alive? >> guest: yes, he is. my mama, bless her heart, passed on. i sometimes think it may have been my mother's fault. my mother tried--she--she was certainly, i assure you without success, to drill good manners into my head. and in some ways i think that manners are just a formal expression of how you treat people. and in--the way black people were treated before the civil rights movement, it was clear to me, was very wrong. it was an easy call. c-span: were they political conservatives, ideological conservatives, your parents? >> guest: yeah. both republicans, lifelong. c-span: you write a column about your mom. it's the last thing in the bo
moments in which people thought he should have shown more courage. >> there were. on civil rights he did not use the bully pulpit as well as he should have. >> rose: richard nixon said he was devious. >> yes. you can have in great quote that eisnehower was a more devious man than people realized and i mean that in the best sense of the word. and he was being sincere and wasn't being funny it is true, eisenhower was deef you in the best sense of the word. >> rose: devious in what way? >> well, he wouldplay dumb is one thi i love about the guy guy talkable about his confidence, once before a conference his aides are coming and saying mr. president you have to be careful, you have to be careful and eisenhower said don't worry i will just confuse them. and he did. and can you imagine a president today being intentionally kind of confusing and dim-witted, but it was useful for eisenhower. >> rose: something about they don't know how dumb i am or i am dumber than they think. >> he was quoted as a dumb bunny he is not, he used to reached mha but it was effectivto be underestimated and learned t
. >>> president obama's in california attending fund-raisers and honoring the late labor and civil rights actist cesar chavez. our white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president right now. what's the latest areaction coming from the obama campaign? >> reporter: first of all, the president himself has not reacted to that speech by mitt romney. but last night at a major fund-raiser in los angeles, he was flexing his foreign policy muscles right off the top of his remarks, he was talking about how he ended the war in iraq, how he's winding down the war in afghanistan, how he's gone after terrorists, how he got osama bin laden. those are just some examples, says his campaign, of strong leadership. as president obama honored civil rights icon cesar chavez -- >> the movement he helped to lead was sustained by a generation of organizers who stood up and spoke out and urged others to do the same. >> reporter: his campaign worked to shred gop nominee mitt romney's foreign policy chops, rolling out this hard-hitting web ad reminding voters of what they called stumbles on the world s
of civil rights, when first elected, he was one of the nation's youngest legislators. his son was also a delicate and is now a radio host here at wbal. >> i celebrate the great live that my father lived. the story he presented to all of us who are beneficiaries of his public policy initiative. >> his nephew says his uncle was a man like no other. he taught him about politics. >> he taught us what it meant to campaign, let's just say. he taught us how to knock on doors. he taught us to be close to people peeping he taught us about organization. you cannot just go out there and put your name on the ballot and expect people to votes. he said you always have to stay close to the people. he was the consummate politician and the consummate campaigner. >> but there were hard times. he served 16 months in federal prison after being convicted in 1987 of influence peddling. >> he had a smile on his face. he was just stronger. you know, they are not going to beat me down. he refused to let people beat him down. and even up into his passing, he was fighting. i saw him last week. >> no one's life i
offenders and they are cunning and devious and to say their civil rights are violated, the first and 14th amendments, because they can't have a sign, you know, and halloween deck kra decorations to come into hair house, they've forfeited their right to have access to children. >> heather: and the attorney likening it to branding. and mentioning what they need to document let's look at the things required in the ordinance, or this law that was actually passed by the city of simi valley. first of all, a sign they have to post on their door, just says this, doesn't say i'm a sex offender, it says no candy or treats at this residence. they have to leave all exterior decorative and ornamental lighting off, 5:00 p.m. to midnight and, refrain from decorating their front yard and house exterior and don't answer the door to children trick-or-treating. >> essentially they are saying, you cannot try to lure these children. we know this is what you do. and we know you want children and know to -- sex with it i should say and you will not change your behavior and here, at the end of the day, when the
of a the most prominent political families. and was also known as a fierce civil rights advocate. >> we do more. i mourn the loss of my father today. i celebrate the great light that he lived. so great. this historic life that he presented to all of us, who are beneficiaries of the public policy initiatives. and the other ways he impacted us as a family as well. >> our condolences go out to the family. there were some hard times for clarence mitchell iii, deserve a 16 months in prison after being convicted in 1987. charges still pending. >> now weather and traffic to gather. >> let us get you up-to-date on the area roads. if you problems your tracking. we will start in hartford county. we have an accident just in the past few minutes your watch for lane closures there. in the meantime, 83 looks good. from the maryland line down to the beltway. we are tracking an accident on a 140 to the inner loop. is backing up traffic there. we will give you a live view in a moment. and the city, russell street -- another accident. building volume on the outer loop. from 70 down toward edmonton. let us look o
, he strengthened america with the focus on federal budget, civil rights, education, and the environment. in the white house, leon panetta was director of the office of management budget and chief of staff, fostering policies that led to a balanced budget in the 1990s making america stronger. at the central intelligence agency, he enabled a spirited response to international terrorism with notable results, disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the nation's 23rd sex tear of defense, leon panetta struck a balance as a force of the advocate for efficiencies also standing resolute in favor of an adequately funded military. bens is pleased to bestow the award recognizing those outstanding americans whose contributions to the country reflect security as the total product of our economic, intellectual, moral, and military strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all
's 7:17 right now. back to savannah, al and matt. where is the civility? >> our democracy at work. and they are in the same party, right? >> exactly the thriller in manila though. >> exactly. >> you want a piece of this? come on. >> mr. roker, what's going on? >> i'm doing okay. let's see how the rest of us are doing weather-wise. we've got a risk of severe storms stretching from dallas all the way to chicago and minneapolis. threat of damaging winds. look at this. as we head on into tomorrow we're looking at this risk of strong storms. can you see them firing up all the way from minneapolis and back down into texas. rainfall amounts, anywhere from 2 to 4 inches of rain, from oklahoma city all the way up to milwaukee. that's what's going on around s >> and that's your latest weather. savannah? >> thank you. barbra streisand is one of the world's most successful performers entertaining all around the globe and never in her hometown of brooklyn, until now. nbc's mara schiavocampo is live with more. mara, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. last night this place was packed with
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
to think about unique ways to get at the heart of what they care about. there is a history, whether civil or women's rights are workers' rights, were people remember why unions were created in the first place most of the world today has the recollection of what happened. you got paid in number that could not let you live in the town in which you lived. the walk to be an evolution in innovation. -- there will have to be an evolution in innovation. with a take their own money create economic development. -- where they take their own money and create economic development. their own investment managers and seeking out economic development opportunities. that is smart. that is looking at how to get folks work and do something to incentivize the economy to move again. there are a lot of intelligent unions thinking differently about it. there are a pretty powerful group. >> wanting to watch, especially in new jersey and the north east, we cut -- we come from more unionized states. one of the things that is important -- is a growing season between public sector and the trades and private sector.
employees say the requirement violates civil rights. the hospital says it's all for the good of the patients. downpours led to chaos on a florida highway series of crashes sending 52 people to the highway. scene unfolding in front of drivers on i-75 saying all they could do was brace for impact. >> there was just a wall of stopped cars. i did as much as i could to avoid it i mean i had no choice. i had to just hit a car. >> i heard the crashes behind us, i looked back and all i saw was vehicles crashing and flying up into the air. >> all you could do was brace and slam the car in front of you and then you got slam and slammed and slammed. >> no word yet on whether anyone was killed. >> hey, alisyn, dave is off but i'm going to handle some sports now. major league baseball playoffs i love this time year. i would love it more if my phillies were in it. one game playoff after this controversial call. watch this. there are bottles and cans falling short and landing oen fast down in the field. >> what are they so angry about? may have started after a braves player was called out on infield fly ru
called the meds extreme. in 2009 the court ruled that new haven connecticut violated the civil rights five-year fighters after the results of a promotion exam because not enough blacks had passed. with liberal leaning justice elena kagan reducing herself a key vote could apply again with justice anthony kennedy as we heard from adam. sandy a democrat. what do you think? >> caller: yes. >> host: what do you think of affirmative action in this case specifically for the court? >> caller: well, first of all i would like to hear the make up and see the makeup of the total top ten when she was denied because we so often have not only racial problems, we can have gender problems as well. so before i want to -- before we get into a big hassle about affirmative action and how we as black people or we as white people as a minority, we are not able to have a fair shot in getting into that college and also listening to the case may be they may need to reform. the racial ethnic of the and a graduate student body this is the university of texas, you can see the makeup in 2010, 2007 over 50% white.
america with his focus on budget, civil rights education and the environment. in the white house he served as director of the office of management budget and his chief of staff brought policies that brought a balanced budget in the 1990's making america stronger. he enabled a response to international terrorism with notable results disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the 2323rd secretary of defense he sought efficient sis while standing resslute in fafere of an adequately funded military. we are pleased to bestow the 2011 award recognizing those outstanding americans who is contributions to the country of security as the total product of our economic intellectual moral strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all of the great things that it does on behalf of those that serve in our military. bruce, my greatest thanks to you for your kind remarks and your leadership here. and i accept this a
and by the way the civil rights act secured passage for it but democrats have co-opted that narrative and we have got to seize control of that so when black republicans come out and say hey, you know, i'm exercising my first amendment right, we get slammed. we get put back in what i call the black box. and, you know what? i never read the black memo that said i have to be a democrat and it's -- >> -- it's crazy. >> i didn't get that one. >> crystal rice thanks so much for coming in and sharing your experience about. this we appreciate it more "fox & friends" in a few minutes. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communit
to tolerance and civility? "fox & friends" starts right now. >> gretchen: good morning, everyone. hope you're gonna have a great tuesday. the whole gang is back today. welcome back, brian to you. >> steve: did you have a nice day off? >> brian: yes, i did. >> steve: what did you do? >> brian: i spent it with my italian side of the family. i told my irish to stay away. we're going to celebrate the great explorer. i'm talking about columbus. >> steve: congratulations. >> brian: special thanks to columbus because i'm loving it here in america. >> gretchen: okay. let's get right to your headlines this morning because we're just one day now from a house oversight committee hearing on the terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. colonel andy wood, the former head of a special forces security team, will testify. he's already said the state department ignored pleas for extra security at the u.s. consulate. more evidence emerging that the obama administration knew within one day the attack was likely terrorism. fox news learning patrick f. kennedy, a top aide to secretary of state hillar
: pamela geller with the american freedom defense initiative won the right to hang posters which read, in any war between civilized man and the savage, support civilized man. support israel. defeat jihad. those same posters will be going up at four d.c. area metro stations before the close of business today. already, metro riders here are speaking out against the move. >> because it is not right to gemmize that jihad, the extremist terroristed and generalize the muslims alls this. i don't approve of that at all. >> i think they should be allowed on free speech grounds but i think it is incredibly irresponsible. >> it is kind of a big thing to call somebody a savage but this is america. freedom of speech. >> reporter: metro went to court after receiving what it called verifiable threats over the poster and out of concern over the recent riots in islamic nations over a california film ridiculing the prophet mohammed. >> even though you have a right to say it, doesn't mean you have to say it. >> i believe that even though it might be going up in the d.c. area, other countries will look a
demonstrate and right to protest almost any cutback, and they have an absurd welfare state. why are they so upset? increase government along replace civil servants extra for coming to work on time. using a computer. in italy teachers no longer can retire with a fat pension at age 39. there are other cutbacks, but not many. european welfare states are bigger than ours. now growing faster than theirs. is this what we face? once people are used to getting free stuff they fight to hold onto it. our welfare state money will run out. people can't keep voting themselves free stuff. well, i guess they can, but the money will run out. mitt romney expresses let's hear what he says about 47 percent of americans are people. >> government has a responsibility to pay for them. believe they are entitled to the health care. john: entitled. people feel entitled to government handouts, they tend to do this. when governments take some handouts away. this hope, maybe we will learn from what is going on in europe. probably not. americans don't pay much attention. the few countries did reform the welfare state w
to suggest that there were financial motives. certainly victims do have a right to be compensated in the civil justice system if, in fact, there has been a conviction in the criminal justice system and sometimes even if there hasn't been a prosecution or a conviction. that doesn't mean that they were not telling the truth because they are seeking financial compensation. >> early this morning, gloria, i was talking to jeffrey fritz, the attorney for victim number four as that young man is now known. here is what he was telling me his client would say in court today. >> his reaction is that of anger. he will demonstrate to the court and tell the court and tell jerry sandusky what these crimes have done to him, his family and the lives of all the victims. >> what kind of an impact could that have on the judge? and how much time, realistically, do you think that jerry sandusky could get? >> well, he's going to get many, many years in prison. i would say that it's highly likely that he could spend the rest of his life in prison, unless and until, of course, if the case is reversed on a
on immigration has been to oppose comprehensive immigration reform and even pros to eliminate birth right citizenship, which has been part of american law since the aftermath of the civil war. >> bill calio for mr. kaine. >> i want to go back to medicare. you jumped the gun on me on that one. medicare provides guaranteed health coverage for people 65 and older and some disabled citizens. when i talk to people, they call that peace of mind. >> call it what? >> peace of mind. but it's also not free. out-of-pocket comforts are high for virginia's beneficiaries, who span an estimated $4,200 or 13% of their income on premiums, co-payments and deductibles. we know every day more boomers are coming into the system and the numbers of people that have earned their right to medicare will continue to grow. while at the same time we also know that the cost of health care still continues to go up. put that all together and medicare needs to be rethought of in terms of where we're going to get the financial footage for it. so i would like to ask you to specifically either give one proposal that you wou
helps prevent backups by sending you monthly doses right to your door so you will never forget to maintain your system. sign up at rid-x.com. right after this. >>> i think that's a special theme song for thursday, for those of you that can't wait for thursday night's vice presidential debate, there was something to ease their cravings over the weekend. >> that was the debate between cable tv heavyweights between bill o'reilly and jon stewart. we have the blow-by-blow. >> we are merely weeks from being a failed state, or even worse, greece, and the way to solve it is to kill big bird. >> it's the debate the election season is clocking in the time. >> can i have one of the cards for this? >> fox news anchor bill o'reilly -- >> adios, sinai raw, it's boring. >> he took on jon stewart in a 90-minute debate saturday night with topics ranging from funding cbs. >> give me the money back, the children's television is -- >> to texas? >> why if you take advantage of a tax break and you are a corporation, you are a smart businessman but if you take advantage of something that you need not
is right for you. [ doctor ] enbrel, the number one biolog medicine prescribed by rheumatologists. >>> more fears that syria's civil war will escalate into a regional fight. for the fifth day in a row syrian army forces are exchanging fire with turkish troops on the border, and in northern syria here's what's happening. syrian troops, they are pushing to retake the key cities of homs and aleppo. opposition activists say at least 76 people have died across syria so far today. this is the suburb of aleppo in northern syria. the person who posted this video on youtube says it shows regime war planes attacking buses there and killing civilians. cnn has no way to independently verify the video. >>> well, empowerment. as children it wasn't a feeling that stella paul or humming bird knew. they didn't know it well at all. they learned find power from within. they broke free from lives of abuse and repression, and now through their work with world pulse and the power of social media they are teaching other women how to do the same. cnn is proud to support world pulse whose mission is to connect wome
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)